Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biophys J. 2015 May 19;108(10):2448-2456. doi: 10.1016/j.bpj.2015.03.035.

Quantifying hydrostatic pressure in plant cells by using indentation with an atomic force microscope.

Author information

1
Laboratoire Reproduction et Développement des Plantes, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique; Laboratoire Joliot-Curie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
2
Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes, UMR 7057, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France.
3
Laboratoire Reproduction et Développement des Plantes, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique; Laboratoire Joliot-Curie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, Lyon, France; Institut Universitaire de France, Paris, France. Electronic address: [email protected]

Abstract

Plant cell growth depends on a delicate balance between an inner drive-the hydrostatic pressure known as turgor-and an outer restraint-the polymeric wall that surrounds a cell. The classical technique to measure turgor in a single cell, the pressure probe, is intrusive and cannot be applied to small cells. In order to overcome these limitations, we developed a method that combines quantification of topography, nanoindentation force measurements, and an interpretation using a published mechanical model for the pointlike loading of thin elastic shells. We used atomic force microscopy to estimate the elastic properties of the cell wall and turgor pressure from a single force-depth curve. We applied this method to onion epidermal peels and quantified the response to changes in osmolality of the bathing solution. Overall our approach is accessible and enables a straightforward estimation of the hydrostatic pressure inside a walled cell.

PMID:
25992723
PMCID:
PMC4457008
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpj.2015.03.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center